Monthly Archives: August 2010

Resume With Monsters by William Browning Spencer – review

August 31, 2010
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Resume With Monsters by William Browning Spencer – review

I originally reviewed Resume With Monsters on November 3, 2006 Over the course of 16 years, 4 novels and 2 story collections William Browning Spencer has been quietly carving out his own bit of territory. His voice is singularly unique combining a vivid imagination and an always odd and sometimes bizarre sense of humor....

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DON’T LOOK TWICE by Andrew Gross – review

August 31, 2010
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DON’T LOOK TWICE by Andrew Gross – review

Ty Hauck, the Greenwich, CT, Detective Lieutenant, is confronted with an ever-shifting set of circumstances following the murder of a Federal prosecutor at a local convenience store, the bullets narrowly missing Ty and his daughter. Initially, the clues seem to indicate a revenge killing not even related to the victim. But all is not...

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FATALLY FLAKY by Diane Mott Davidson – review

August 31, 2010
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FATALLY FLAKY by Diane Mott Davidson – review

Goldy Schulz, caterer deluxe, returns in her 15th appearance in this series. It is summer in Colorado, and she is about to do a wedding for the bride from hell, who has already changed the wedding date twice, along with every other aspect of the nuptials, Bridezilla Billie, as Goldy thinks of her, is...

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Spinetingler hits 100 thousand

August 30, 2010
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Since the reboot in February, in just 28 weeks, Spinetingler has had 100,000 visitors. To you, the 100,000th visitor and to all of the others we say thanks. Here’s to another 100,000. Brian LindenmuthBrian is the non-fiction editor of Spinetingler magazine and one of the fiction editors of Snubnose Press. In addition to Spinetingler...

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SILENCER by James W. Hall – review

August 30, 2010
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SILENCER by James W. Hall – review

Thorn is a unique character. In the previous installment of this series he inherited a billion-dollar corporation, but spurned any involvement in its operation, leaving the day-to-day activities to his girlfriend, Rusty, who seems to be doing a bang-up job. Both, however, are interested in preserving the environment, and toward that end, Rusty develops...

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Three Days to Never by Tim Powers – review

August 30, 2010
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Three Days to Never by Tim Powers – review

I originally reviewed Three Days to Never on October 31, 2006 We are introduced to recent widower Frank Marrity and his 12 year old daughter Daphne. Upon the death of his grandmother in 1987 they discover some things in her shed that finds them in the middle of a covert war between the Mossad...

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Benjamin Whitmer – interview

August 30, 2010
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Benjamin Whitmer – interview

Since the death of Larry Brown there have been at least a dozen novelists touted as the heir to Brown’s gritty throne. Needless to say, there have been few who’ve actually lived up to the promise. However, with Benjamin Whitmer’s stark debut, Pike, the Denver, Colorado based novelist easily rivals Brown’s most renowned novels....

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The Guns of Pike by Benjamin Whitmer

August 30, 2010
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The Guns of Pike by Benjamin Whitmer

by Benjamin Whitmer I’m going to start with what I hope isn’t a shocking confession in the world of crime fiction: I’m a bit of a gun nut. Though admitting that in some places seems tantamount to professing an interest in pedophilia — or, perhaps worse, being a cigarette smoker — I’m hoping that...

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THE LOCK ARTIST by Steve Hamilton – review

August 30, 2010
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THE LOCK ARTIST by Steve Hamilton – review

The story of “The Lock Artist,” the wonderful new standalone by Steve Hamilton, the author of the justly popular Alex McKnight series, is told in a series of flashbacks covering the decade of the ’90’s. Not written in linear fashion, each chapter’s time frame helpfully appears atop each page, but the reader nonetheless has...

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Transubstantiate By Richard Thomas – review

August 30, 2010
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Transubstantiate By Richard Thomas – review

Reviewed by Chris Deal The New Black There’s a lot of discussion going on these days in regards to what it means to be noir, whether the genre requires all the old tropes, the hard-boiled, anti-hero private detective, the femme fatale, organized crime or corrupt law.  Since the heyday of the ’40s and ’50s,...

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THE CRACK IN THE LENS by Steve Hockensmith – review

August 29, 2010
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THE CRACK IN THE LENS by Steve Hockensmith – review

Our book club’s book for March was Steve Hockensmith’s THE CRACK IN THE LENS. For those who haven’t experienced this delightful series, it takes place in the rough-and-tumble Old West (or thereabouts), when men were tough and women were tougher, especially those saloon gals. Our heroes are the Amlingmeyer brothers. Older brother Gustav (“Old...

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THE UNNAMED by Joshua Ferris – review

August 29, 2010
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THE UNNAMED by Joshua Ferris – review

Tim Farnsworth is apparently the victim of a strange malady, part narcolepsy, part something else entirely, something which seems to be unknown in the annals of medicine to date: an inexplicable and completely irresistible, uncontrollable compulsion to walk. When an “attack” begins, it can last for days, or months, for miles and miles, even...

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Short Thoughts on Short Fiction–My summer anthologies

August 28, 2010
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Short Thoughts on Short Fiction–My summer anthologies

Hey gang, So how’s the summer been going for ya’ll? Yeah, hot and busy here in my adopted home town of the Valley of the Sunand I know, I haven’t been around old Spintingler all that much the past couple of months, but after pissing off a couple of writers here in the pages...

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PAGANINI’S GHOST by Paul Adam – review

August 28, 2010
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PAGANINI’S GHOST by Paul Adam – review

Music is the theme of this delightful novel, a sequel to the author’s equally charming debut effort, “The Rainaldi Quartet,” which featured the luthier violin-repairer and -maker Giovanni Castiglione. This time, the mystery involves the violinist and composer Paganini, whose virtuosity and audacity provide Mr. Adams with a wealth of material to inform and...

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BLOOD MOON by Garry Disher – review

August 28, 2010
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BLOOD MOON by Garry Disher – review

To say that Adrian Wishart was a control freak would be an understatement. It is, therefore, perhaps understandable that when he reports his wife missing, the police are less concerned than Mr. Wishart might have hoped. After all, his wife has not been missing for very long. His fears, however, ultimately prove to be...

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Animal Kingdom by David Michod – Review

August 27, 2010
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Animal Kingdom by David Michod – Review

The record is broken and it keeps fucking repeating itself, dear reader, and the bit of song that is driving me mad goes like this: “The best crime flicks today are from overseas.”  The latest example, Animal Kingdom, comes from Australia, a country that previously this year gave us the undeniably awesome The Square.  Shit, some...

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SKIN by Mo Hayder – review

August 27, 2010
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SKIN by Mo Hayder – review

There are all kinds of protagonists, but the two featured in this novel (after first appearing in “Ritual”) are very different. Jack Caffery and Phoebe (“Flea”) Marley carry pretty heavy baggage from their past, but they get the job done somehow in this thrilling police procedural, despite their individual quirks and iconoclastic attitudes. DI...

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The Long Fall by Lynn Kostoff – review

August 27, 2010
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The Long Fall by Lynn Kostoff – review

A short while back I was blown away by Lynn Kostoff’s recently re-released debut, A Choice of Nightmares, a book that straddled the line between literary character study and crime novel in truly exciting ways.  As amazing an experience as that novel was, with his second novel, 2003’s The Long Fall, dude managed to...

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The Language of Defeat and a challenge redux

August 27, 2010
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Last year in response to Banville-gate I issued a challenge in two parts over at my old blog. In light of Ray Banks’ essay today over at Mulholland, A Donkey in the Grand National, I thought we could try to revisit it. Especially since the wonderful Spinetingler audience is considerably larger then my blogs...

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THEREBY HANGS A TAIL by Spencer Quinn – review

August 27, 2010
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THEREBY HANGS A TAIL by Spencer Quinn – review

This book has two protagonists. Bernie Little, West Point graduate, veteran of the Gulf wars and ex-cop, is the human component, and Chet the K-9 schooled one-hundred pound canine with mis-matched ears who communicates with his owner/partner in his own doggie shorthand,...

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