Monthly Archives: September 2010

Death Echo by Elizabeth Lowell – review

September 30, 2010
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Death Echo by Elizabeth Lowell – review

International intrigue is at the heart of the plot which joins Emma Cross, former CIA operative and now with St. Kilda’s Consulting, and Mackenzie Durand, former Special Ops leader, the only survivor of his team in its last mission. Now a transit captain, he picks up a brand new yacht, the Blackbird, offloaded from...

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The White Trilogy by Ken Bruen – review

September 30, 2010
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The White Trilogy by Ken Bruen – review

“Here are your poor, your tired, your hungry; your predatory crack dealers, your arsonists; your killers for money, for revenge, for enforcement, and for sheer ugly fun…” The White Trilogy is an omnibus edition that contains the three novels The White Arrest, Taming the Alien and The McDead. “Roberts had got the call at...

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The Impossible Bird by Patrick O’Leary – review

September 29, 2010
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The Impossible Bird by Patrick O’Leary – review

I originally reviewed The Impossible Bird by Patrick O’Leary on November 22nd, 2006. Mike and Danny are brothers who were close when they were younger but grew apart as they got older, especially after one particular summer. Mike is a successful director of commercial spots who lead a rootless lifestyle and answers to no...

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Death on the Aegean Queen by Maria Hudgins – review

September 28, 2010
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Death on the Aegean Queen by Maria Hudgins – review

The third Dotsy Lamb Travel Mystery takes the protagonist on a cruise among the Greek islands, along with her friends and Captain Marco Quattrocchi, the Carabinieri captain she previously met in Florence in an earlier installment. Early on Dotsy discovers a pool of blood on a deck, and when no other answer presents itself,...

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Thunder Beach by Michael Lister – review

September 28, 2010
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Thunder Beach by Michael Lister – review

Merrick McKnight is a recent victim of the downsizing of The Democrat, the newspaper published in his town in the Florida Panhandle. As the tale opens, he finds himself in a somewhat questionable relationship with a married stripper working one of the apparently numerous stripper bars...

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Excerpt of Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane

September 28, 2010
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Excerpt of Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane

Harper Collins has the first chapter of Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane available as an excerpt. Brian LindenmuthBrian is the non-fiction editor of Spinetingler magazine and one of the fiction editors of Snubnose Press. In addition to Spinetingler his work has appeared in Crimespree magazine and at BSC Review, Galleycat and the Mulholland Books...

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The Rising by Brian Keene – review

September 28, 2010
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The Rising by Brian Keene – review

I originally reviewed The Rising by Brian Keene on November 27th, 2006. Jim Thurmond is locked in an underground shelter that he built for Y2K, in Virginia. The zombie invasion is already in full swing. His dead pregnant wife is outside pawing on the door and calling his name. Going mad and on the...

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True Grit teaser trailer

September 27, 2010
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Brian LindenmuthBrian is the non-fiction editor of Spinetingler magazine and one of the fiction editors of Snubnose Press. In addition to Spinetingler his work has appeared in Crimespree magazine and at BSC Review, Galleycat and the Mulholland Books website. He also heads the Spinetingler Award committee.More Posts - Website - Twitter

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Boardwalk Empire “The Ivory Tower” – review

September 27, 2010
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Boardwalk Empire “The Ivory Tower” – review

Review by Mike Dennis The hijacking of a truckload of bootleg liquor bound for New York is so far proving to be the central event in this unfolding HBO series. Johnny Torrio has the booze now, over Big Jim Colosimo’s dead body. Now that he’s running the Chicago mob, with Al Capone lurking in...

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Red Riding Trilogy by Julian Jarrold, James Marsh & Anand Tucker

September 27, 2010
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Red Riding Trilogy by Julian Jarrold, James Marsh & Anand Tucker

David Peace’s English answer to James Ellroy’s “LA Quartet” (The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, LA Confidential, and White Jazz), the “Red Riding Quartet” (1974, 1977, 1980, and 1983) has been adapted by screenwriter Tony Grisoni into a fantastic trilogy for UK Channel 4 and is now available on DVD (and netflix on demand) in the US.  To say that you...

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A Drink Before the War by Dennis Lehane – review

September 27, 2010
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A Drink Before the War by Dennis Lehane – review

I originally reviewed A Drink Before the War on November 22nd, 2006. The job is a simple one; their clients want them to locate a missing employee who may have taken some important documents. They are to find the missing woman and tell the client her location. They actually accomplish this pretty easily and...

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The Town by Ben Affleck

September 26, 2010
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The Town by Ben Affleck

The Town is a solid crime movie.  It’s got some nifty action, sharp dialogue, a strong narrative, gritty locales, and a cast packed with good actors doing good work.  Let’s fucking shake on it, it’s a date, I’m in – however you want to phrase it: The Town is a good time at the...

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Bodily Harm by Robert Dugoni – review

September 26, 2010
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Bodily Harm by Robert Dugoni – review

Combining the elements of a thriller and a courtroom battle over a defective toy which apparently has resulted in the deaths of two young children, this novel marks the return of Seattle’s David Sloane, “the lawyer who does not lose.” The plot includes various subplots, including corporate greed, espionage and an adoption battle over...

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Half-Price Homicide by Elaine Viets – review

September 26, 2010
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Half-Price Homicide by Elaine Viets – review

In the latest entry in her Dead-End Job Mystery Series , Helen Hawthorne, 41 years old, has been working at Snapdragon’s Second Thoughts, a high-end clothing consignment shop in South Florida. When a customer is found dead in a dressing room, apparently hanged with –...

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Stettin Station by David Downing – review

September 25, 2010
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Stettin Station by David Downing – review

The chronicle of journalist John Russell begins in Nazi Berlin a week before Pearl Harbor in this, the third novel in the series . The descriptions of Gestapo tactics and the beginnings of the “final solution” are eerily chilling. Russell is ostensibly a correspondent for a San Francisco...

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Live to Tell by Wendy Corsi Staub – review

September 25, 2010
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Live to Tell by Wendy Corsi Staub – review

Lauren Walsh is a young Westchester, NY suburbanite still devastated by the breakup of her marriage, made even more so by the fact that her husband left her for another woman, and the not-unexpected effects that has had on her three children. Elsa Cavalon is trying without much success to recover from the disappearance...

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An outsiders perspective on noir

September 24, 2010
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Matt Denault, an old online friend, recently reviewed The City and The City by China Mieville and Finch by Jeff VanderMeer. In them he muses on the nature of noir and kicks around the term a little bit. But here’s the thing, he doesn’t read a lot of crime fiction. He is a hell...

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Boardwalk Empire – Pilot – review

September 23, 2010
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Boardwalk Empire – Pilot – review

Review by Mike Dennis Does the show live up to the hype? Were the trailers more than just a souped-up come-on for a time-waster? Is Steve Buscemi really as badass as he seems in the trailers? Yes, yes, and yes. Sunday night’s premiere of Boardwalk Empire on HBO might well be the most impressive...

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Kiss Her Goodbye by Allan Guthrie – review

September 23, 2010
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Kiss Her Goodbye by Allan Guthrie – review

I originally reviewed Kiss Her Goodbye by Allan Guthrie on November 18th, 2006. Allan Guthrie presents a surprisingly sophisticated and well crafted tale that subtly weaves in subplots and observations of his characters that keep the suspense going until the final chapters. This is a down and dirty and sometimes mean tale that begrudgingly...

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In Search of Crime Fiction’s Shadow Cabinet

September 23, 2010
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Too many writers and readers prefer their literature spoon-fed to them, in portions similar to the last, with the same smells and colors, served to them on the same worn dishes, and accompanied by the same polite conversation. It seems to me that reading—reading well, with an appreciation for more than just the basics...

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