Monthly Archives: December 2011

Hell On Church Street by Jake Hinkson – review

December 30, 2011
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Hell On Church Street by Jake Hinkson – review

The Nerd fucking tore through this one, dear reader, tore through it like it was a stack of pancakes at three o’clock on a black-out drunken Saturday morning.  Hell On Church Street, Jake Hinkson’s addictively creepy debut novel, reads fast but lingers long, his lead character and narrator of Brother Geoffrey Webb acting as...

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Flash Fiction: Breaking and Entering by Mike Miner

December 30, 2011
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Jimmy wanted to forget but all he could do was remember. He felt like a shuffling deck, his heart was flipping, his vision blurred, playing all kinds of Matrixy tricks on him.  Freezing.  Speeding up.  His skin was a swarm of bees, buzzing, lips tingled. “This is some good shit,” he told Gilbert. Gilbert...

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[POLL] Tell us what should be nominated for Spinetingler Awards

December 29, 2011
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We always try and seek as much input as possible in gathering nominees for the Spinetingler Awards. We keep an eye on end of year best of lists from different places and we invite people to tell us what they liked. In addition to these I want to try an updated version of something...

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Already Gone by John Rector – review

December 27, 2011
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Already Gone by John Rector – review

John Rector doesn’t fuck around in Already Gone.  The novel opens with Jake Reese, college professor and author, being assaulted outside of a restaurant, the attackers taking his wedding ring.  The thing is, they take the ring finger with it.  It’s an intense, no-bullshit scene that sets the tone for a very intense, blessedly...

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Why we should ban history by Damien Seaman

December 27, 2011
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Why we should ban history by Damien Seaman

Why we should ban history What was the biggest lie your teachers told you at school? Tough question, I know. If your experience was anything like mine you’ll have a long list to choose from. That said, pretty close to the top has to be this little gem: that we learn history so we...

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Flash Fiction: A Straight Face by Court Merrigan

December 23, 2011
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Mekk didn’t want to marry Nit. He didn’t have anything against her. But he wanted out of the sticks, out of Chang Saen, on the road, down to Bangkok, out where he could make his own name. Here in Chang Saen he would someday run his father’s grocery, making him the grocer. Right now...

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Stolen Souls by Stuart Neville – review

December 22, 2011
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Stolen Souls by Stuart Neville – review

Okay, book nerds of internetland, what’s the fucking deal?  The Ghosts of Belfast drops in the US in 2009 and every other post out there is about how fucking awesome Stuart Neville is.  Such praise was just as all hell because, you know, Ghosts fucking rocked our collective shit hardcore, but dude didn’t go...

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Dead Harvest by Chris F. Holm – review

December 20, 2011
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Dead Harvest is a triumphant debut that felt like the book I’d been waiting on for years without knowing it. I grew up loving science fiction and fantasy, and still enjoy it a bit though the prose can be ponderous in many of the titles. But here, Chris takes the elements of imagination and...

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Flash Fiction: Walking Out by Sandra Seamans

December 16, 2011
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Beth stared at her image in the mirror. Strands of grey hair sticking out at odd angles and blood crusting in the wrinkles of her face like flecks of gold in a deep stream. She sighed, stripped off her clothes and stepped into the shower. She let her mind drift back over the years...

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The Whisperers by John Connolly – review

December 14, 2011
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There is always the element of the supernatural in a Charlie Parker novel. And The Whisperers is no exception. However, reality plays an important part in the theme, giving the author the opportunity to reflect on the horrors of war and its effects – especially combat stress – on the lives of those who...

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So Much Pretty by Cara Hoffman – review

December 14, 2011
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What at first blush appears to be a bucolic setting is soon discovered to be much less innocent than it first seems. Gene and Claire Piper have moved from their lives in New York City to the small western NY town of Haeden, an isolated, hardscrabble place close to Appalachia whose residents have a...

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Started Early, Took My Dog by Kate Atkinson – review

December 14, 2011
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Be forewarned: This is not an easy book to read. It has a complicated plot, filled with a wide assortment of characters, and jumps back and forth both in time and between circumstances. It flits episodically so that this reader, at least, became confused more than once. It was work to read, despite some...

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A Lesson in Secrets by Jacqueline Winspear – review

December 14, 2011
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The common characteristics of the Maisie Dobbs series are the growth in the character, developments over time and, of course, current events. In the present novel Maisie, who served as a nurse in France during World War I (after having been a servant girl before), has grown over the years, mentored by Dr. Maurice...

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Short Thoughts on Short Fiction: Matthew C Funk

December 13, 2011
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At All Due Respect this month, Matthew creates a spinning, confusing and yet crystal clear voyage inside the mind of madness in his story “Broken Play”. A man consumed by regret and crack, lost in memories and drugs stumbles through a normal activity that becomes a quest and trial. Outside his mind, the story...

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Woe to Live On by Daniel Woodrell – review

December 12, 2011
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Woe to Live On by Daniel Woodrell – review

Here it comes, dear reader, another love letter to the work of Daniel Woodrell from your dear old Nerd.  I wish I could, after having read all of his work at this point, have something controversial, some nit-pick at the very least, to say about one of his novels, but I just can’t find...

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Dove Season by Johnny Shaw – review

December 9, 2011
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Dove Season by Johnny Shaw – review

Johnny Shaw’s Dove Season is an entertaining series of mistakes, bravado, self-reflection and bad situations. Told through Jimmy Veeder (the center of the fiasco for which the story is named) the story ranges over family relations, friendships, confrontations with the past, sex, guns, money and secrets. Driven by a strong narrative, and escalating danger,...

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Choke Hold by Christa Faust – review

December 9, 2011
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Choke Hold by Christa Faust – review

Choke Hold, Christa Faust’s long-awaited follow-up to Money Shot, starts out quietly enough.  It’s been a couple years since Angel Dare testified against the sex traffickers from the first book and went into witness protection.  Now she’s working in an Arizona diner waiting tables.  An old co-star from her porn days, “Thick Vic,” comes...

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Backyard by Carlos Carrera – review

December 8, 2011
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Backyard by Carlos Carrera – review

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I decided to watch this Mexican meanie. Backyard or El Traspatio, if you understand Spanish looks like a horror movie from the cover and the blurb, but it’s really not what it looks like. I was pleasantly surprised to find a rather ballsy crime...

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Aging Moe by Reed Farrel Coleman

December 7, 2011
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Aging Moe by Reed Farrel Coleman

My first detective novel, Life Goes Sleeping, was published twenty years ago. The two decades that have since passed have seen the most amazing changes in my life. My daughter Kaitlin is on the verge of college graduation. My son Dylan, born slightly premature the year after my first novel was published, is now...

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El Gavilan: The Hector Lassiter Connection By Craig McDonald

December 6, 2011
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El Gavilan: The Hector Lassiter Connection By Craig McDonald

“We dance around in a ring and suppose, While the secret sits in the middle and knows.“– Robert Frost Trace the circle: El Gavilan, my new novel about illegal immigration and a murder that rocks an Ohio town, is my fifth published piece of long-form fiction. It’s my first standalone novel. After four installments...

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