Month: February 2012

Blood & Tacos #1 is out now

The first issue of Blood & Tacos is out now. There was a time when paperback racks were full of men’s adventure series. Next to the Louis L’Amours, one could find the adventures of The Executioner, the Destroyer, the Death…

Wolf Tickets by Ray Banks – review

Wolf Tickets is Ray Banks’ “fuck yeah!” book, the novel where he delivers the most straight-up hard-boiled thrills per page than in anything he’s written to date.  It follows two ex-army hard men, Farrell and Cobb, as they track down…

Rampart by Oren Moverman – review

Oren Moverman is a helluva director, an artist more interested in character than plot, in questions rather than answers, and who has a gift for working with actors, especially with his muse, Woody Harrelson.  With just two films, The Messenger…

Voices Of The Dead by Peter Leonard – review

The horrors of Nazi Germany and the monstrous experiences of Jews has never been something I’ve had the desire to read about, it’s far too traumatic to digest, and yet Leonard has the ability to walk you through just enough…

The Killing of Emma Gross by Damien Seaman – review

The Killing of Emma Gross is a piece of historical fiction loosely based on the murders committed by Peter Kurten in Dusseldorf, Germany in 1929-30.  If Kurten’s name doesn’t ring a bell with you, dear reader, don’t go googling around…

The Killer is Dying by James Sallis – review

The first thing one perceives on reading the first pages of James Sallis’ new novel is the literal accuracy of the title: The man who calls himself Christian is a contract killer, a Vietnam vet now terminally ill, on his…

What it Was by George Pelecanos – review

The year was 1972. Derek Strange was out of the Metropolitan Police Dept. for four years and struggling to build up his PI agency. Nixon was in the White House, but not for long. Watergate was just up ahead. The…

Where All the Dead Lie by By J.T. Ellison – review

As this newest entry in the Taylor Jackson series opens, although the serial killer whose death ended the last book, “So Close the Hand of Death,” is no longer around to continue his terror campaign, his legacy is very much…

Flash Fiction: Cosmo in the Mourning by Gary Clifton

Special Agent Cosmo Pierre LeBleu sat in the center of the Houston DEA squad-room surrounded by undercover types.  Cosmo was pudgy, balding, with thick glasses. He looked as out of place as Al Capone in church. Group Supervisor Waylon Kitchings,…

Stagger Bay by Pearce Hansen – review

There’s nothing safe about Stagger Bay, the new novel from Pearce Hansen.  Dude likes his violence levels set at “ultra” and keeps his tone around “operatic” throughout, and if that shit doesn’t appeal to your ass, dear reader…well, it’s a…

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