Table of Contents

Fall 2007

Short Stories

Bus Stop

Deep Freeze

In the Ditch

Missed Connections

My Bedtime Buddy

On Silent Feet

Out of Service

Ric With No K

The Rorschach Affair

The Years of the Wicked

Under the Blanket of the Sun

Upon A New Road

Reviews

Ammunition

Bad Thoughts

Beating the Babushka

Bloodthirsty

Hidden Depths

Pay Here

Play Dead

Poison Pen

Silence

Who Is Conrad Hirst

Profiles/Features

Bronx Noir

In For Questioning

Together We Write

Profile: Derek Nikitas

Pelecanos Country

Interviews

George Pelecanos

Robert Fate

Rick Mofina

Kevin Wignall

Review:

HIDDEN DEPTHS by Ann Cleeves

Review by Martin Edwards

Following the success of her Shetland-based RAVEN BLACK, which won last year’s CWA Duncan Lawrie Dagger for best crime novel, Ann Cleeves returns to the North East and re-introduces one of her most memorable characters, DI Vera Stanhope, who first appeared in THE CROW TRAP. RAVEN BLACK was originally conceived as a one-off, just as Cleeves had no plans to write a series about Vera at the time she created her. However, the acclaim accorded to the Shetland book has led to a contract which will see three more titles; in the meantime, Vera’s latest investigation offers much to enjoy. The novel opens with a stunning first chapter in which a woman returning home from a night out discovers the murdered body of her son, Luke. He is dead in the bath, and flowers have been left in the water. A friend of Luke’s died not long before and soon another murder occurs – again, there are flowers in the water. The novel is well-structured, with no loss of pace as Vera rounds up the small group of suspects. The motivation of the culprit struck me as somewhat unexpected, but this is a quibble. The twin strengths of the book are the character of Vera Stanhope, one of the most appealing fictional detectives to emerge since Andy Dalziel got into his stride, and the rural North Eastern setting, evoked by Cleeves with her characteristic perception, and much skill.

About the Reviewer:
Martin Edwards’ acclaimed Lake District Mysteries are The Coffin Trail (nominated for the Theakston’s prize for best crime novel of 2006) and The Cipher Garden. Both are published in the US by Poisoned Pen Press. His seven novels about Harry Devlin include All the Lonely People, short-listed for the CWA John Creasey Memorial Dagger, and Suspicious Minds, both published by Five Star in the US. The author of a stand-alone psychological thriller, Take My Breath Away, he also completed the late Bill Knox’s last book, The Lazarus Widow. In 2002 he published a book about homicide investigation, Urge to Kill.

He has edited 14 crime anthologies, such as the CWA’s Golden Jubilee collection, Mysterious Pleasures, and contributed to many others, as well as publishing Where Do You Find Your Ideas? and other stories. His story ‘Test Drive’ was short-listed for the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2005. A well-known critic and commentator on crime fiction, he has contributed essays to various reference books, including The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing, as well as to a wide range of magazines.

To find out more about Martin Edwards and his work, visit www.MartinEdwardsBooks.com. Martin also writes for Mystery Scene and Deadly Pleasures.

Martin Edwards’ acclaimed Lake District Mysteries are The Coffin Trail (nominated for the Theakston’s prize for best crime novel of 2006) and The Cipher Garden. Both are published in the US by Poisoned Pen Press. His seven novels about Harry Devlin include All the Lonely People, short-listed for the CWA John Creasey Memorial Dagger, and Suspicious Minds, both published by Five Star in the US. The author of a stand-alone psychological thriller, Take My Breath Away, he also completed the late Bill Knox’s last book, The Lazarus Widow. In 2002 he published a book about homicide investigation, Urge to Kill.

He has edited 14 crime anthologies, such as the CWA’s Golden Jubilee collection, Mysterious Pleasures, and contributed to many others, as well as publishing Where Do You Find Your Ideas? and other stories. His story ‘Test Drive’ was short-listed for the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2005. A well-known critic and commentator on crime fiction, he has contributed essays to various reference books, including The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing, as well as to a wide range of magazines.

To find out more about Martin Edwards and his work, visit www.MartinEdwardsBooks.com. Martin also writes for Mystery Scene and Deadly Pleasures and blogs at http://www.doyouwriteunderyourownname.blogspot.com/