Posts Tagged ‘ Adrian McKinty ’

Gun Street Girl by Adrian McKinty — Review

February 18, 2016
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Detective Sean Duffy is a well-established character, with the Troubles in Northern Ireland the background for his efforts. This novel takes place in 1985 and ostensibly begins as a murder inquiry and evolves into a wider case involving gun smuggling. Duffy, a Catholic in Protestant Belfast, is akin to all the iconic protagonists much...

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In The Morning I’ll Be Gone by Adrian McKinty – review

May 31, 2014
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In The Morning I’ll Be Gone by Adrian McKinty – review

“The Troubles Trilogy” by Adrian McKinty, the detective series set in Northern Ireland during the early 80’s featuring RUC Inspector Sean Duffy, comes to a close with In the Morning I’ll Be Gone, and you better believe the Nerd is in mourning.  McKinty has long been one of crime’s strongest voices and this is...

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I Hear Sirens in the Street by Adrian McKinty – review

May 22, 2013
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I Hear Sirens in the Street by Adrian McKinty – review

Adrian McKinty’s Sean Duffy trilogy is shaping up to be a police procedural series for the fucking ages, dear reader.  After last year’s ridiculously assured The Cold, Cold Ground we now get the even darker and more gripping I Hear Sirens in the Street and the Nerd for one can’t wait to get his greazy...

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Falling Glass by Adrian McKinty – review

July 10, 2012
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Falling Glass by Adrian McKinty – review

Adrian McKinty’s Falling Glass is a kick-ass thriller full of violence, sharp prose and great dialogue, all related at a swifter-than-all-hell pace.  It’s also a deeply felt story of a man wrestling with his identity as he enters middle-age.  Add to that plenty of laughs and some of the tightest action and suspense sequences this...

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The Cold, Cold Ground by Adrian McKinty – review

February 7, 2012
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The Cold, Cold Ground by Adrian McKinty – review

It’s the spring of 1981 and Detective Sergeant Sean Duffy has just been transferred to Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland.  While the riots are raging just five miles south in Belfast over the hunger strikes by IRA prisoners in the Maze, in Carrickfergus two gay men have been murdered.  At first it looks like IRA informer...

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Mercury Tilt by Adrian McKinty

January 17, 2012
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Mercury Tilt by Adrian McKinty

Mercury Tilt by Adrian McKinty My new crime novel, The Cold Cold Ground is set in Northern Ireland in 1981 during the most famous of the IRA hunger strikes. This was the heart of the “Troubles” when bombings were frequent and terrorist attacks a daily occurrence. I grew up in a Protestant housing estate...

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Falling Glass by Adrian McKinty – review

April 4, 2011
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Falling Glass by Adrian McKinty – review

While Ireland’s economic fate seems to shift annually, its consistent output of quality crime fiction has been a reliable genre staple throughout the last decade. And among the cream of the Irish crop is Adrian McKinty – a remarkably gifted writer of relentlessly paced tales that explore some of the darkest terrain of the...

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Diarmaid and Grainne by Adrian McKinty from Requiems for the Departed – review

October 6, 2010
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Diarmaid and Grainne by Adrian McKinty from Requiems for the Departed – review

reviewed by Matthew Funk When I was eight years old I read the novel The High Deeds of Finn MacCool by Rosemary Sutcliffe. The most compelling part of the story for me was the tale of Diarmaid and Grainne. I’ve never forgotten it and I liked the idea of putting a contemporary spin on...

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2010 Spinetingler Award Best Novel: Rising Star WINNER

May 1, 2010
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Spinetingler would like to congratulate all of the nominees and thank all of the voters. Just a reminder that a summary post with all of the winners will available this evening. With 530 votes cast in this category the winner of the 2010 Spinetingler Award for the Best Novel: Rising Star is… Brian LindenmuthBrian...

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James Patterson Does Not Exist

April 1, 2010
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Guest Article by Adrian McKinty Until Dick Francis’s death a few weeks ago libel laws prevented critics from revealing an open secret about Francis’s novels, namely the fact that it was Francis’s wife Mary who had done a lot of the heavy lifting on his books. As a racing correspondent and champion jockey Dick...

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