Posts Tagged ‘ Minotaur Books ’

Kill You Twice by Chelsea Cain – review

January 23, 2013
By

Archie Sheridan, a detective at the Major Case Task Force in Portland, Oregon, for years had headed what was termed the Beauty Killer Task Force, dedicated to tracking down and bringing to justice a megalomaniac serial killer whose victims were tortured and killed in gruesome ways, graphically described. Their target, Gretchen Lowell, a stunning...

Read more »

Available Dark By Elizabeth Hand – review

January 21, 2013
By

This novel isn’t one that defies description, exactly, but it does make it difficult. Its tone is bleak throughout, perhaps in keeping with the geographical landscape, made palpable by the author’s gorgeous writing. The plot is not complex, but that is not the crux of the book, which is the haunting quality of its...

Read more »

Hush Now, Don’t You Cry by Rhys Bowen – review

January 21, 2013
By

Finally Molly Murphy and Capt. Daniel Sullivan get married and are on their honeymoon as the book opens, only to be interrupted on the second day when Dan is recalled to duty to investigate a tunnel which collapsed during the building of the new subway. To make up for the break, Alderman Brian Hannan,...

Read more »

Restless in the Grave by Dana Stabenow – review

September 22, 2012
By

This latest Kate Shugak novel imports the protagonist from another Stabenow series, Liam Campbell, relegating Jim Chopin, Kate’s lover, to a walk-on role. It also takes place far away from her home base in Alaska, The Park. Liam has a problem, and he visits Jim for his help. It appears a leading citizen of...

Read more »

Cut, Paste, Kill by Marshall Karp – review

January 7, 2012
By

A woman, the wife of the British consul in Los Angeles, is found stabbed to death in the ladies room of a posh hotel, a scrapbook recalling her transgression, killing a young boy leaving a school bus while DWI, nearby. Lomax and Biggs, the comic LAPD homicide detectives, catch the call. Then they learn...

Read more »

Death Toll by Jim Kelly – review

January 7, 2012
By

A protagonist like DI Peter Shaw gives the author license to throw more curve balls at the reader than a major league pitcher. Shaw, a super-cerebral, over-intuitive detective who develops more and more theories as a case develops and he encounters more facts, certainly proves the point in this novel, which has two plot...

Read more »

Rizzo’s Fire by Lou Manfredo – review

October 1, 2011
By

There are many police procedurals, but few on the down and dirty street level of veteran detective Joe Rizzo, who has been around long enough to have collected all sorts of favors, seen most of everything possible in Brooklyn and developed his own set of standards, ignoring, often, “the book” but solving “the crime.”...

Read more »

The Night Season by Chelsea Cain – review

September 22, 2011
By

In this, the fourth book in the series featuring police detective Archie Sheridan, Gretchen Lowell, the beautiful, sadistic serial killer who in previous entries shared the stage with Archie, is little more than backdrop, a recurring theme playing almost entirely offstage. Gretchen has now been in jail for six months ....

Read more »

The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino – review

September 22, 2011
By

Cleverly pitting the logic of a mathematician against that of a physicist, and then the physicist vs. an intuition-leaning detective, this Japanese novelist has written a clever murder mystery with an innovative ending. There is no mystery as to the murderer: A single mother, aided by her daughter, strangles her abusive ex-husband. What then...

Read more »

Though Not Dead by Dana Stabenow – review

September 22, 2011
By

Nearly a century’s worth of Alaskan history serves as the backdrop for this latest Kate Shugak novel, as witnessed by the long life of “Old Sam,” her uncle. When he dies at the age of nearly 90, he leaves Kate as his only legatee, with instructions for gifts to a few, and a letter...

Read more »

On Borrowed Time by David Rosenfelt – review

September 20, 2011
By

This is a potboiler of a novel, the author’s third standalone. He is remembered most fondly for his Andy Carpenter series and admired for his home for sick and injured dogs. He has now turned his creative self to a sort of sci-fi mystery in which journalist Richard Kilmer lives in both a real...

Read more »

The Attenbury Emeralds by Jill Paton Walsh – review

September 14, 2011
By

I have a confession to make: I never read any of the Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane mysteries. As a result, I suppose, I can approach this novel without any prejudice about the originals written by a legendary author, the redoubtable Dorothy L. Sayers. And I can firmly state that I have been remiss and...

Read more »

Dead Like You by Peter James – review

September 7, 2011
By

This fifth book in the superb Roy Grace series begins in 1997, when he was a 29-year-old Detective Sergeant, a meaningful time in his life, firstly because it was shortly before his wife, Sandy, walked out of his life never to be seen or heard from again, and secondly because it was when there...

Read more »

Stranglehold by Ed Gorman – review

May 20, 2011
By

The cynical political consultant Dev Conrad returns in this well-plotted, twisting tale of intrigue and blackmail during a Congressional election campaign. The candidate has a long-standing hidden secret which, of course, could cost her the election. Dev’s staff is at its wit’s end trying to keep the campaign on an even keel, but the...

Read more »

Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny – review

May 19, 2011
By
Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny – review

The book takes place in and around Quebec City, Canada, where the dwindling Anglophone community feels it is still fighting wars 250 years in the past. One which the English had won, “securing Quebec for the English, on paper,” but not so in actuality. Even beyond the strong separatist feelings, there is a great...

Read more »

Red Herring by Archer Mayor – review

May 13, 2011
By
Red Herring by Archer Mayor – review

This long-running series featuring Joe Gunther and his team at the Vermont Bureau of Investigation has been consistently excellent. And this, the 21st entry, is of similar high quality with an inventive plot: Three murders are committed, seemingly with no connection, except for a single drop of blood. The victims are apparently unrelated and...

Read more »

Bleed a River Deep by Brian McGilloway – review

February 23, 2011
By
Bleed a River Deep by Brian McGilloway – review

As this newest book in the series begins, Inspector Benedict (“Ben”) Devlin has set his sights on a very wealthy. influential and powerful man, John Weston, who he suspects is guilty of . . . something, he’s not quite sure what. But his very attitude of arrogance and something akin to condescension raises Devlin’s...

Read more »

The Devil by Ken Bruen – review

February 23, 2011
By
The Devil by Ken Bruen – review

“The Devil” reads like a cocktail of Xanax and Jameson, with a side of Guiness. Maybe that’s because Jack Taylor absorbs that combination on practically every page of the novel. Describing a book by Ken Bruen is no easy task, and the smart thing would be to not make any attempt to do that,...

Read more »

Burn by Nevada Barr – review

January 11, 2011
By
Burn by Nevada Barr – review

It is likely that fans of the Anna Pigeon series might be put off by several aspects of this novel. To begin with, it takes place in the urban setting of New Orleans rather than the accustomed wide open spaces of a national park. Then there is the topic: not only...

Read more »

The Wolves of Fairmount Park by Dennis Tafoya – review

October 28, 2010
By
The Wolves of Fairmount Park by Dennis Tafoya – review

This mystery novel is more about the characters than the crime involved. It begins with a drive-by shooting in a bad Philadelphia neighborhood in which two teenage boys are hit, one dying, the other in a coma at the ER. As a result any number of people want to find out why the two...

Read more »