Posts Tagged ‘ Soho Crime ’

Night Rounds by Helene Tursten – review

January 21, 2013
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It’s taken a long time for this 1999 novel to cross the ocean, but the wait has been worthwhile. It is part of a series in which the protagonist is Inspector Irene Huss, a former Jiu-Jitsu champion, and is a Swedish police procedural. The action takes place in a private hospital specializing in surgery...

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Port Vila Blues by Garry Disher – review

January 21, 2013
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Although I had heard of this Australian author, before picking up “Port Vila Blues,” I had not read any of his previous novels. He has written over 40 books, including most conspicuously the Inspector Hal Challis series. This book, written in 1995, is the fifth in the Wyatt series, which now total seven entries,...

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A Mortal Terror by James R. Benn – review

February 11, 2012
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The Billy Boyle World War II Mysteries follow the progress of that conflict in this, the sixth installment, albeit it with a different twist. It brings Billy his first murder case, either as a Boston detective (in his previous civilian life) or as “uncle” Ike’s special investigator. But the horrors of the war in...

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Collusion by Stuart Neville – review

January 15, 2012
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This follow-up to the highly praised “The Ghosts of Belfast” deserves the same reception. It picks up where the earlier noir ended, carrying forth the characters and planting the seeds for the third novel. Jack Lennon, a Catholic detective in an otherwise Protestant police force in Northern Ireland, is warned off investigating the deaths...

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Murder in Passy by Cara Black – review

November 8, 2011
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As Bogey said: “We’ll always have Paris.” Or at least as long as Cara Black keeps writing the Aimee Leduc series, set in the City of Lights. This is the 11th entry in the series, and is a bit different from its predecessors. While its setting is still a particular area of Paris, this...

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Frozen Assets by Quentin Bates – review

September 14, 2011
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This English-born first-time author, who splits his time between Iceland and England, undertook to write this murder mystery around a contemporary idea: the collapse of Iceland’s monetary and banking system , coupled with massive political corruption. As a murder mystery it works fairly well for an initial effort. On...

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Random Violence by Jassy Mackenzie – review

September 7, 2011
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Jade deJong , the headstrong protagonist of this terrific new novel, is a p.i. who has left her native South Africa, but following a ten-year absence has returned after, most recently, doing surveillance work in England. Her father, before his death, had been police commissioner in Johannesburg, described as a city filled with crime...

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Red Jade by Henry Chang – review

July 1, 2011
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Red Jade by Henry Chang – review

Detective Jack Yu somehow can’t escape New York’s Chinatown in this third novel in the series. Apparently, he is the Fifth Precinct’s token Chinese-American, called upon when sensitivity to the community and its inhabitants is necessary. He had recently transferred to the Ninth Precinct in Brooklyn and he moved to that borough’s Sunset Park...

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Collusion by Stuart Neville – review

May 16, 2011
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This follow-up to the highly praised “The Ghosts of Belfast” deserves the same reception. It picks up where the earlier noir ended, carrying forth the characters and events, and, presumably, planting the seeds for a third novel which hopefully will develop into a full-blown series. Jack Lennon, a Catholic detective in an otherwise Protestant...

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The Caterpillar Cop by James McClure – review

December 5, 2010
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The Caterpillar Cop by James McClure – review

This Kramer and Zondi novel, one of eight in the series written before the author’s death in 2006, was first published in Great Britain in 1972. It is now reprinted for our enjoyment. Unlike The Steam Pig, which focused on the horrors of apartheid, Caterpillar centers its attention on the repressive sexual attitudes of...

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The Steam Pig by James McClure – review

December 4, 2010
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The Steam Pig by James McClure – review

Before his death four years ago, the author wrote eight novels in this series, featuring a white CID lieutenant, Tromp Kramer, and his black assistant, Sgt. Zondi. The setting for “The Steam Pig” was apartheid South Africa, and the descriptions of that society are poignant and overwhelming, while the plot follows the unraveling of...

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The Ghosts of Belfast by Stuart Neville – review

November 8, 2010
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The Ghosts of Belfast by Stuart Neville – review

The “Troubles” in Northern Ireland have spawned many novels, but none as intense and different as Ghosts. Based on the past efforts of Republicans to force unification with Eire and the conflicts between Catholics and Protestants in the North, the novel focuses on the torment of Gerry Fegan who has, as an assassin on...

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THE SANDBOX by David Zimmerman – review

September 11, 2010
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In his debut novel, David Zimmerman’s territory, literally and figuratively, is the frequently discomfiting one of Iraq and the ongoing war there. The reader is immediately thrust into the conflict on the first page when Pvt. Toby Durant discovers the dead body of a naked child in the middle of the road while riding...

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RANDOM VIOLENCE by Jassy Mackenzie – review

September 10, 2010
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RANDOM VIOLENCE by Jassy Mackenzie – review

Jade deJong , the headstrong protagonist of this terrific new novel, is a p.i. who has left her native South Africa, but following a ten-year absence has returned after, most recently, doing surveillance work in England. Her father, before his death, had been police commissioner in Johannesburg, described as a city filled with crime...

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MURDER ON THE PALAIS ROYAL by Cara Black – review

September 9, 2010
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MURDER ON THE PALAIS ROYAL by Cara Black – review

The sights, sounds and smells of Paris were authenticated not only in the reading of this novel, but in actually reading it while in the City of Light. Thus, a double pleasure was experienced as we followed the adventures of Aimee Leduc along the streets and boulevards through which we both walked. Aimee’s troubles...

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