Tag Archives: St. Martin’s Press

Think Twice by Lisa Scottoline – review

Think Twice, Lisa Scottoline, St. Martin's PressFirst there was Cain and Abel. In this novel we have Bennie Rosato and her twin sister, Alice Connelly (they were separated at birth and raised by different mothers). Bennie grows up to be a highly successful Philadelphia lawyer, heading her own firm, while Alice turns out evil.

Alice has drugged Bennie, burying her alive, and then impersonates her in an attempt to transfer all of Bennie’s money out of the country and flee. She convinces everyone, including the bank, that she is Bennie, and succeeds in transferring the funds to an offshore institution. Meanwhile, Bennie breaks through the box in which she is buried, but runs into all kinds of obstacles when she is believed to be Alice.

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Theodore Feit

The Feit's reviews appear in numerous media outlets.

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Still Missing by Chevy Stevens – review

Still Missing Chevy StevensThis is an interesting novel, despite its shortcomings: Basically the writing is uneven, and in many ways pretentious. A young woman, Annie Sullivan, a realtor on Vancouver Island, Canada, is abducted by a psycho and kept captive for a year, subjected to daily rapes and severe regimentation, severe enough to drive anyone practically insane. She becomes pregnant and the baby dies after a short period of time.

The story of her year-long captivity is recounted in a series of sessions with a psychiatrist. In fact, instead of calling each new section of the book a chapter, it is called a Session. And, of course, the after-effects are recounted as well. What is unexpected is the ultimate unraveling of just why she was abducted to begin with, in a terrific twist.

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Theodore Feit

The Feit's reviews appear in numerous media outlets.

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Vanished by Joseph Finder – review

Vanished by Joseph FinderJoseph Finder has written several thrillers revolving around the business and corporate world. Each was a standalone. Now, he turns his attention to creating the beginning of a series. The protagonist is Nick Heller, a tough, principled investigator with a high-powered private intelligence firm.

Nick’s father is serving a 30-year sentence in Federal prison for insider trading and corporate fraud, among other things. His brother is a top-level mergers-and-acquisitions attorney for a leading defense manufacturing conglomerate. Nick is close to his sister-in-law, the administrative assistant to the CEO of the company in which his brother plies his trade, and especially close to his nephew.

The tale begins with an attack on Nick’s brother and sister-in-law as they leave a Georgetown restaurant one evening. The woman suffers a concussion and is near death, and the brother disappears, an apparent abduction. His nephew calls Nick to ask for his help. And the plot moves forward in many unexpected directions. Nick is an interesting character, and he promises to be a powerful and intriguing protagonist in future entries in the series. Recommended.

Gloria Feit

The Feit's reviews appear in numerous media outlets.

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Think Twice by Lisa Scottoline – review

Think twice by Lisa ScottolineFirst there was Cain and Abel. In this novel we have Bennie Rosato and her twin sister, Alice Connelly (they were separated at birth and raised by different mothers). Bennie grows up to be a highly successful Philadelphia lawyer, heading her own firm, while Alice turns out evil.

Alice has drugged Bennie, burying her alive, and then impersonates her in an attempt to transfer all of Bennie’s money out of the country and flee. She convinces everyone, including the bank, that she is Bennie, and succeeds in transferring the funds to an offshore institution. Meanwhile, Bennie breaks through the box in which she is buried, but runs into all kinds of obstacles when she is believed to be Alice.

Continue reading

Theodore Feit

The Feit's reviews appear in numerous media outlets.

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Trust No One by Gregg Hurwitz – review

Nick Horrigan was frightened away from his LA home when he was 17 years old, under threat of being arrested for murder, to Alaska, and now in his thirties, he’s back and leading a relatively quiet life in Los Angeles. But, as the old saying goes, you can’t escape the past. And now he is caught up in it. And somehow he has to chase it down.

A SWAT team bursts into his apartment one evening, ripping everything apart, then taking him to a nuclear power plant because someone who is threatening to explode a bomb there will only speak to Nick. Nick enters the plant and the person there hands him a key before being blown up. And that is the key to the mystery which Nick has to solve.

It is an excellently conceived story, written with an eye toward contemporary political intrigue and spin. It is engrossing and full of conspiracy leaving the reader to twist and turn, not only at the surprises, but pages, as quickly as possible. Recommended.

Theodore Feit

The Feit's reviews appear in numerous media outlets.

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